Jacaranda

Jacaranda mimosifolia

Common name:

Jacaranda

Scientific name:

Jacaranda mimosifolia (Bignoniaceae)

Alternative common names:

Blue Brazilian; blue jacaranda; Brazilian rosewood; fern tree (English); jakaranda (Afrikaans)

The best-known city tree in Johannesburg and Pretoria – a deciduous or semi-deciduous tree up to 22m high with a rounded, spreading crown. Dark green, hairy, finely divided and fern-like leaves which turn yellow in late autumn or winter. Attractive mauve-blue to lilac or rarely white, tubular flowers produced in pyramidal sprays at the ends of usually leafless branches, flowering from September-November. Oval, flattish, woody green capsules about 60mm long, which turn brown and split open after about a year to release numerous flat, winged seeds. It invades savanna, wooded kloofs, rocky ridges and river banks.

Additional Info

  • Where does this species come from?

    South America (north-west Argentina)

    What is its invasive status in South Africa?

    CARA 2002 – Category 3 NEMBA – a. 1b in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North-West. b. Not listed for urban areas in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North-West. c. Not listed within 50 metres of the main house on a farm in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North-West, for trees with a diameter of more than 400 mm at 1000 mm height at the time of publishing of this Notice, provided such trees are located outside riparian areas. d. Not listed elsewhere.

    Where in South Africa is it a problem?

    Common throughout Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces.

    How does it spread?

    Seed dispersal.

    Why is it a problem?

    Competes with and replaces indigenous species. Dense stands along watercourses are likely to reduce stream flow.

    What does it look like?

    General description: Deciduous or semi-deciduous tree up to 22m high with a rounded, spreading crown. Leaves: Divided, slightly hairy fern-like leaves which are dark green, but turn yellow in late autumn or winter. Flowers: Attractive mauve-blue to lilac or rarely white, tubular flowers produced in pyramidal sprays at the ends of usually leafless branches, flowering from September-November. Fruit/Seeds: Distinct, purse-shaped oval, flattish, woody green capsules about 60mm long, which turn brown and split open after about a year to release numerous flat, winged seeds.

    Does the plant have any uses?

    Used as an ornamental and hedge plant, as well as a very popular pavement tree.

    Plant me instead alternatives

    Tree wisteria (Bolusanthus speciosus), coral tree (Erythrina lysistemon), pom pom tree (Dais cotinifolia), Cape chestnut (Calodendrum capense).